CSR – What does it mean for charities?

city of london

Today saw the Chancellor publish the Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR) which he also announced in Parliament. The CSR sets out the Government’s spending plans for years ahead, and this version is scheduled to take public spending up until 2016, which coincides with the year after the next general election.

Whilst the CSR does not explicitly account for any impact on charities, there are a couple of interesting nuggets in there. Firstly, the Chancellor pledged to maintain spending on civil society problems which, it is hoped, will continue the spirits generated by the Olympics next year and boost volunteering and civic action.

Secondly, the majority of money that charities receive from government is received via local government, rather than central government. Whilst the CSR does produce figures pertaining to local government expenditure, it does so on a mass scale, and does not account for variations between different councils.

It is figures produced on a council-by-council relevance that will have the most interest for charities, as the 2.3% real terms funding reduction for local government announced by the Chancellor today will apply different to councils based on a number of contributing factors.

Charities across the country must wait the publication of the local government finance settlement to see those figures in full, but in the meantime take a look at CAF Campaigns Manager Fiona McEvoy’s article on the Back Britain’s Charities website, which explains in more detail just what the CSR means for charities.

Steve Clapperton

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